A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn: James DeWolf’s Diary and Letters, 1876

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University of Oklahoma Press #ad - Henry porter, who survived the conflict, retrieved his diary and sent it to DeWolf’s widow. While researchers have known of DeWolf’s diary for many years, few details have surfaced about the man himself. In spring 1876 a physician named james madison dewolf accepted the assignment of contract surgeon for the Seventh Cavalry, becoming one of three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s battalion at the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Now available in this accessible and fully annotated format, the diary, along with the DeWolf’s personal correspondence, serves as a unique primary resource for information about the Little Big Horn campaign and medical practices on the western frontier. Killed in the early stages of the battle, he might easily have become a mere footnote in the many chronicles of this epic campaign—but he left behind an eyewitness account in his diary and correspondence.

Harburn bridges this gap, providing a detailed biography of DeWolf as well as extensive editorial insight into his writings. Later, the dewolf family donated it to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. In a surgeon with custer at the Little Big Horn, Todd E. As one of the most highly educated men who traveled with custer, the surgeon was well equipped to compose articulate descriptions of the 1876 campaign against the Indians, a fateful journey that began for him at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and ended on the battlefield in eastern Montana Territory.

A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn: James DeWolf's Diary and Letters, 1876 #ad - A surgeon with custer at the little big Horn is the first annotated edition of these rare accounts since 1958, and the most complete treatment to date. In letters to his beloved wife, fannie, weather conditions, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way.

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The Godfrey Diary of the Battle of the Little Bighorn: Expanded, Annotated

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Independently published #ad - Godfrey was a central figure in the Reno-Benteen defense over the 25th and 26th of June, 1876. Lieutenant edward settle godfrey was commander of K Company of the 7th Cavalry in the battalion of Captain Frederick Benteen. Both of these documents are cited by most serious Custer books. It also contains fascinating details about how the cavalry moved, camped, and relaxed during the days leading up to the fight.

In 1892, then captain godfrey wrote what became a very famous and widely-read article for Century Magazine about the Battle of the Little Bighorn. He kept a diary of the yellowstone Expedition against the Sioux from May 17 to September 24. The diary reveals anecdotes and observations of General Custer's mood and behavior before the fight on June 25th, as well as the desperate story of survival experienced by the battalions under Reno and Benteen.

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The Terry Diary: Battle of the Little Bighorn

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Independently published #ad - It begins in mid-May, 1876 and ends in August. Two of the most important source documents of the 19th century Indian wars. Terry's official report is included in this book and is a document used by virtually all Custer writers. Also included is the field diary Terry kept while on expedition. General alfred terry was the commander of the Yellowstone Expedition that ended in the death of George Armstrong Custer and 261 of his men.

Noted are incidents of Custer and Reno acting without authority or against orders.

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Custer's Lost Scout

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Idle Winter Press #ad - This is the story of left hand, scout, who served General George Armstrong Custer as a guide, a Hunkpapa Sioux, and messenger during the campaign that ended at Custer’s Last Stand. Through conversations with his friend john eagle shield a relative of Sitting Bull and Medical Director of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, his own knowledge of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and a rudimentary understanding of Lakota language and customs, the author was able to piece together what happened.

Some questions remain, but the fact that Left Hand joined the U. S. Left hand was a member of the sub-tribe of the Sioux Nation known as the Hunkpapa Lakota, part of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Army, honorably served out his full enlistment, rejoined his own people just before the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and died defending the Sioux and Cheyenne from Custer is recorded by the Hunkpapa Lakota at Standing Rock.

Custer's Lost Scout #ad - Government records and primary sources document Left Hand’s service as a scout and warrior, but the reasons behind this service remain a mystery. Left hand, was given an honored funeral by the warriors who fought Custer.

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Deliverance from the Little Big Horn: Doctor Henry Porter and Custer's Seventh Cavalry

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University of Oklahoma Press #ad - It will also ensure that the selfless deeds of a lone “contract” surgeon—unrecognized to this day by the U. S. Porter’s wartime exploits goes far beyond the battle itself. Government—will never be forgotten. There began a harrowing 700-mile journey along the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers to the post hospital at Fort Abraham Lincoln near Bismarck, Dakota Territory.

With its new insights into the role and function of the army medical corps and the evolution of battlefield medicine, this unusual book will take its place both as a contribution to the history of the Great Sioux War and alongside such vivid historical novels as Son of the Morning Star and Little Big Man.

He evacuated the critically wounded soldiers on mules and hand litters, and a treacherous descent into the safety of the steamboat Far West, the scaling of a steep cliff, embarking on a hazardous trek of fifteen miles that required two river crossings, waiting at the mouth of the Little Big Horn River.

Deliverance from the Little Big Horn: Doctor Henry Porter and Custer's Seventh Cavalry #ad - In this compelling narrative of military endurance and medical ingenuity, Joan Nabseth Stevenson opens a new window on the Battle of the Little Big Horn by re-creating the desperate struggle for survival during the fight and in its wake. As stevenson recounts in gripping detail, porter’s life-saving work on the battlefield began immediately, as he assumed the care of nearly sixty soldiers and two Indian scouts, attending to wounds and performing surgeries and amputations.

But the story of Dr. Of the three surgeons who accompanied custer’s seventh cavalry on june 25, only the youngest, survived that day’s ordeal, twenty-eight-year-old Henry Porter, 1876, riding through a gauntlet of Indian attackers and up the steep bluffs to Major Marcus Reno’s hilltop position.

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Artifacts of the Battle of Little Big Horn: Custer, the 7th Cavalry & the Lakota and Cheyenne Warriors

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Schiffer Military History #ad - Years were spent photographing and acquiring artifacts in museums and private collections, which are presented here in vivid, high-resolution color photographs, shot from various angles with the researcher and collector in mind. Hundreds of photographic images accompanying the chapters are filled with informative descriptions regarding physical properties, origin of the items, history, and the stories behind them.

Schiffer Publishing. This book is a first-of-a-kind comprehensive, photographic essay regarding surviving artifacts of Custer and the Battle of the Little Big Horn – some never before published. This definitive work will provide a valuable resource for military researchers and historians, as well as an aesthetically stunning photographic essay to compliment any collection or library.

Artifacts of the Battle of Little Big Horn: Custer, the 7th Cavalry & the Lakota and Cheyenne Warriors #ad - The photographs are catalogued under chapters devoted to the battle, Custer's 7th Cavalry, and the Lakota and Cheyenne warriors who fought them.

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Arrow to the Heart: The Last Battle at the Little Big Horn: The Custer Battlefield Museum vs. The Federal Government

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Post Hill Press #ad - Kortlander vigorously fought this criminal allegation and eventually revealed a vast conspiracy of government corruption and espionage. Christopher kortlander, the private owner of Garryowen and the focus of the raid, was suspected of selling valuable historical artifacts with false provenance. Arrow to the heart is the fascinating story of how Christopher Kortlander, Montana, the owner of the private town of Garryowen, fought off the federal government and exposed a vast conspiracy of corruption and espionage.

In the spring of 2005 a federally orchestrated raid took place at the small Montana town of Garryowen. Schiffer Publishing. He also exposed stunning connections between his raid, the Gibson Guitar raid, and a raid in rural Utah that led to the deaths of multiple people.

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Custer Went First

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MCP Books #ad - The author uses army reports, Indian recollections, official Army testimonies, and on-site evaluations and photos by the author to describe the battle. Based on soldier and indian survivor accounts, much of the Battle of the Little Bighorn occurred while Custer was incapacitated. This book is an important read to fully understand the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

This book explores the battle with a different approach and perspective. Custer Went First. Custer did have a battle plan. Subordinate officers made key decisions that ultimately ended in the annihilation of five companies of the Seventh Cavalry. Schiffer Publishing. Custer was implementing that attack plan when he was shot early in the battle.

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Custer: The Making of a Young General

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Skyhorse #ad - In these campaigns and subsequent ones, Custer's reputation for surging ahead regardless of the odds almost always with successful results that appeared to validate his calculating recklessness was firmly established. More than just a history book, his character and personality; his attitudes toward leadership; his tactical preferences, Custer: The Making of a Young General is a study of Custer's formative years, especially for the mounted charge; his trademark brashness and fearlessness; his relations with his subordinates; and his attitudes toward the enemy with whom he clashed repeatedly in Pennsylvania and Virginia.

Custer goes into great depth and detail than any other study of Custer's Civil War career, while firmly refuting many of the myths and misconceptions regarding his personal life and military service. Schiffer Publishing. Although over time custer would bring out excellence in his charges, eventually leading the Wolverines to prominence, his first test came just days later at Hanover, then Hunterstown, and finally Gettysburg.

Custer: The Making of a Young General #ad - Fascinating and insightful, it belongs on the shelf of every history buff. But before his time in the West, Custer began his career fighting for the Union in the Civil War. In custer: the making of a Young General, legendary Civil War historian Edward G. In 1863, commander of the army of the potomac's horsemen, under the patronage of General Alfred Pleasonton, a young but promising twenty-three-year-old Custer rose to the unprecedented rank of brigadier general and was placed in charge of the untried Michigan Calvary Brigade.

Longacre has provided excellent contribution to the literature on George Custer.

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Rosebud, June 17, 1876: Prelude to the Little Big Horn

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University of Oklahoma Press #ad - Schiffer Publishing. The battle of the rosebud may well be the largest Indian battle ever fought in the American West. The result is a uniquely comprehensive view of an engagement that made history and then changed its course. Troops and their indian allies as Brigadier General Crook commenced his second great campaign against the northern Indians for the year.

. It set the stage for the battle that occurred eight days later when, just twenty-five miles away, George Armstrong Custer blundered into the very same village that had outmatched Crook. Throughout he weighs the decisions and events that contributed to Crook’s tactical victory, and to his fateful decision thereafter not to pursue his adversary.

With informed attention to the subtleties and significance of both outcomes, as well as to the fears and motivations on all sides, Hedren has given new meaning to this consequential fight, and new insight into its place in the larger story of the Great Sioux War. Rosebud was at once a battle won and a battle lost.

The monumental clash on june 17, 1876, along rosebud creek in southeastern Montana pitted George Crook and his Shoshone and Crow allies against Sioux and Northern Cheyennes under Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Describing the battle from multiple viewpoints, Hedren narrates the action moment by moment, capturing the ebb and flow of the fighting.

Rosebud, June 17, 1876: Prelude to the Little Big Horn #ad - Both indian and army paths led to rosebud Creek, where warriors surprised Crook and then parried with his soldiers for the better part of a day on an enormous field. Drawing on an extensive array of sources, including government reports, diaries, and a previously untapped trove of newspaper stories, reminiscences, the book traces the movements of both Indian forces and U.

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The Other Custers: Tom, Boston, Nevin, and Maggie in the Shadow of George Armstrong Custer

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Skyhorse #ad - War hero tom custer earned two Medals of Honor during the Civil War before riding into the West with his brother. There was the bashful and enigmatic Nevin Custer, and the young Boston Custer, whose one desire in life was to share the adventures of his idolized older brothers. The book also uncovers much more detail about the ancestors and descendants of the Custer siblings than is to be found in other Custer biographies.

This is their story. Not one, not two, but three Custer brothers died at the Little Bighorn—and so did their only sister's husband. So too did their nephew and the husband of their only sister. Margaret custer married into the 7th Cavalry and was widowed at twenty-four when her husband, James Calhoun, was among the dead at the Little Bighorn.

The Other Custers: Tom, Boston, Nevin, and Maggie in the Shadow of George Armstrong Custer #ad - This book is a must for all those interested in the enduring Custer legend. The other custers traces the upbringing of the family and follows Nevin and Margaret as they carried the Custer name beyond Little Bighorn. Where other custer literature focuses solely on George Armstrong, The Other Custers is the only volume to explore the lives of the Custer siblings in depth.

Schiffer Publishing. Less than half the immediate Custer family would survive the massacre.

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